Spying on a Significant Other Is Becoming an Acceptable Form of Social Paranoia

So. A new online dating survey of 2,000 lonesome souls found out some pretty salient information, which is that there are quite a few Americans who apparently think that it's fine to sift through a significant other's emails, texts and browsing history. More than a third of the survey's respondents said that they'd be totally fine playing Wishbone with an SO's digital footprints, with 37 percent saying that spying is acceptable if "bad behavior" is suspected. More women than men thought it was morally no big deal to snoop around through a lover's electronic missives (only 29 percent of men thought snooping was acceptable, though a wide gulf exists between what one professes and what one does).

Younger respondents were more at ease with electronic gumshoeing than older respondents, with 36 percent of 18 to 34-year-olds saying that snooping was fine and only 26 percent of adults over the age of 55 agreeing. While it's probably not advisable to be dating someone you feel the need to spy on long-term, most of the survey respondents were probably considering new emotional journeys they'd embarked on with near-strangers from the internet. A healthy dose of suspicion is required when dealing with things that one encounters on the internet, so electronically canvassing a new squeeze's inbox isn't really that dishonest or paranoid, considering the weird crustaceans one can dredge up from the internet's sea floor.

37% Percent of Adults Approve Snooping Through Texts [SURVEY] [Mashable]

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