Whore Pill-Hating GOP Pretending the Whole Supreme Court Upholds Obamacare Thing Didn't Happen

Usually, when the Supreme Court upholds a law, that's it; the law is constitutional. If you want to keep on challenging that ruling, you basically have to make an entirely new law that mandates the opposite of the upheld law and then wait for it to be challenged all the way back to the Supreme Court, and then the Supreme Court has to declare the new law constitutional, which would then, I guess, beat the old law in legal Rock, Paper, Scissors. I don't know; I'm not a law expert. Neither, apparently, are Republican Attorneys General from seven states, who say they plan on continuing to fight Obamacare's free contraception mandate, even after the Affordable Care Act has been upheld by the Court.

In a move that seems a bit, uh, religious, Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning (and, one presumes, Nebraska taxpayers' money) has joined forces with a few Catholic groups to claim that the Affordable Care Act's preventative care mandate, which would require all employee-provided health care plans fully cover contraception for women who choose to use it, is violating the organization's religious freedom to make people who work for them use only non slatternly medications. In the suit, the plaintiffs call these objectionable items "contraceptives, sterilization and abortion-inducing drugs." (At this point, it should be noted that this another attempt by the anti-contraception crew to conflate contraception and abortion. The Affordable Care Act will not force any employer to pay for abortion services or abortion-inducing drugs for female employees, but it will require employers to cover the cost of emergency contraception, which is contraception, not abortion. To refer to it as such is a flat-out lie. Okay. Off soapbox.)

Although they're technically challenging the very law that the Supreme Court just upheld, some legal experts think Bruning and the holy rollers may kind of sort of have a case, reports the Washington Post, as the suit is about religious liberty, a separate issue than the general suit aimed at stopping the Affordable Care Act's implementation. But, on the other hand, the Obama administration has kind of bent over backward to accomodate religious institutions, even allowing them to pass the entire cost of contraception to the insurance company. The administration has also given them until August of 2013 to comply with the new mandate, a year longer than other employers.

Proponents of the mandate say it's good policy because medical experts who didn't go to Ave Maria College for undergrad agree that universal access to low cost contraception is a public good that ultimately leads to healthier women, healthier children, lower insurance premiums (because birth control pills are a helluva lot cheaper than pregnancy and childbirth) and could put a dent in the estimated $11 billion unplanned pregnancies cost taxpayers every year. Opponents of the contraception mandate say yeah, but sluts. What about sluts? Don't sluts bother you? Aren't we enabling sluttery? Slut slut slutty mcslut.

Obama administration compromises are also not enough for Attorneys General from Florida, Michigan, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas, who plan on continuing their hopeless dead horse beatdown at the expense of taxpayers until the good lord Jesus calls them back home.

If only they paid as much attention to the clitoris as they did to the vagina, American women might actually enjoy getting fucked by their elected officials.

[Washington Post]