Scientists Find the Genes That Determine Breast SizeS

Good news for those of you who are dying to know how you ended up with the breasts you did: A new study has found seven genetic markers that are linked with breast size in women. It has long been known that breast size was in part passed down through families, but this research is the first to locate the specific genetic factors that are associated with variations in lady bumps.

While this is sort of interesting by itself because, hey, boobs! What is really relevant is that two of the factors that are associated with breast size have also previously been tied to an increased risk for breast cancer. This suggests, according to Nicholas Eriksson who led the research (which was done by genetics testing company 23andMe), that some of the same pathways that govern breast growth are also involved in breast cancer development.

Previous research has found a connection between breast density and cancer risk, and there have also been a few studies that have found a link between larger breasts in lean women and breast cancer. This new study doesn't by itself prove that there is a link between breast size and cancer, but it will likely help scientists figure out what role breast structure plays in increasing risk of breast cancer. So far, this knowledge doesn't seem to be leading down the road to monkeying around with our DNA to give our offspring the best possible cleavage, but you know that at some point in the future, when we are all baking in 9,000 degree weather, this will very definitely be a thing.

Genes for Breast Size Found [MyHealthNewsDaily]

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