Earning a Certificate Is Becoming the Next Great Way to Experience the Gender Pay Gap

The economy totally sucks. It sucks so much that if you turn on any news channel or flip to the op-ed page of that newspaper you're not reading because physical, page-turning newspapers are really only good for getting ink under your fingernails, someone will be shouting or writing, "Argh! Economy! Euro! Debt crisis! Federal Reserve!" in so many words. This challenged economy has even called some to question the value of a bachelor's degree and the debt they might incur pursuing one, which is why more and more hopeful workers are trying other ways to enter the creaking workforce, like earning a certificate, an option that offers people the opportunity to experience the same gender pay gap that associate's, bachelor's, and master's degree holders experience.

According to a report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, is the certificate, fast becoming the most popular form of postsecondary education on the block, so don't try and step to it because it will shut you down. GOOD's Education Editor Liz Dwyer broke down the report's findings, noting that 22 percent of Americans now earn certificates, up from six percent in 1980. Certificate holders also earn an average of $39,000, which, though less than the $54,000 average for bachelor's degree holders, is ten grand more than the average yearly earnings of someone with only a high school diploma.

Some certificate holders can even out-earn their collegiate counterparts, especially if they work in computer and information services and have penises, of course. Dwyer writes, "Thanks to gender inequity, just as a man with a bachelor's degree can out-earn a woman with a master's degree, women don't benefit from certificates as much as the guys do." So, while a man working in computer and information services may earn $72,000, a woman working in the same field might expect $57,000. Disheartening as that disparity may be, a woman with that computer and information services certificate still earns more than 75 percent of her associate's degree peers and 64 percent of of those elitist bachelor degree holders.

Is the Certificate the New College Degree [GOOD]

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