Zombie Apocalypse Watch: Take A Second To Call Your Mom And Make Sure She Knows That "Bath Salts" Are Not, Like, Anthropologie Bath Salts

In case you didn't know, fortunately, the "pamper-yourself" gift package that friend of the family sent you for your graduation does not contain the powerful, awesomely scary drug responsible for Miami's naked zombie who ate the homeless guy's face off which I am sure you have already discussed at work/on dates/at the mall/on a boat/on a plane/with green eggs and ham. (Also, if you were interested: copycat cannibalism case in Maryland! And if your salad still looks good, here's Daily Intel's comprehensive recent history of people nomming people.)

But, anyway. Bath salts.

Bath salts are a street drug that skyrocketed in the U.S. in 2011; they primarily consist of mephedrone, MDPV, and methylone (all banned last year by the DEA) and have been linked to bizarre, violent behavior and death—or "nightmarish hallucinations of LSD with the craving of crack cocaine," as the Daily Mail described it. Incredibly, until recently they were legal everywhere, available in stores and online for $15 to $20 with names like... uh, like bath salts, actually. Ivory Snow, Red Dove and Vanilla Sky. In January of this past year, a New Orleans woman lost her arm, shoulder and breast after injecting the drug.

Since the Miami cannibal attack, Congress has finally turned its attention to banning the drug nationwide.

'Bath salts': Officials say the synthetic drug in disguise was behind recent ‘cannibal' attack' [NYDN]
'Miami 'Zombie Apocalypse' Puts Bath Salts Ban in Congressional Spotlight' [US News & World Report]
'What Bath Salts Will—And Won't Make You Do' [Daily Beast]

Image via oksix/Shutterstock.