Priscilla Chan Eschews Overpriced Footwear and Dresses Up as LegumesS

Who is Priscilla Chan, other than married to Mark Zuckerberg and casually not interested in a New York Times interview? She's a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma, at least, she is if you're trying to figure out where she pops up in The Social Network, which is where I've acquired all of my deepest insight into Mark Zuckerberg's personal life.

According to friends of the newlyweds, Chan, who recently graduated from the University of California's medical school with the aim of becoming a pediatrician, is pretty cool. Mind you, not get-all-boozed-up-and-light-a-friend's-hair-on-fire cool, but cool nonetheless. She rarely speaks to the media unless in so doing she can help Facebook, and is rarely tagged in party pictures, which is more than most people can say. Her interests include voting against Prop 8 and Fage yogurt. She and her husband fawn over their dog Beast. She makes lemon ricotta pizza, which sounds good? I can't decide. Sometimes she serenades a nest of cardinals near her bedroom window with her harpsichord.

Most importantly, the Times notes that Chan spent a mere $4,700 on her wedding dress (a dress that, apparently, nobody else wants), despite the fact that she could presumably hang glide on a glider with extremely thin gold sheets for wings. In fact, this fiscal conservatism seems to be Chan's most remarkable virtue, especially if you appreciate it when the mega-wealthy at least pretend to live in the same dimension as we do. Randi Sister-of-Mark Zuckerberg shared an endearing anecdote about shoe-shopping with her sister-in-law and failing to convince Chan to splurge on a $600 pair of shoes.

Not only did Chan refuse to shod herself in outrageously-priced footwear, she also, according to a fellow resident of College Terrace, hands out her own Halloween candy, dressed (ironically, I'd imagine) as a pea pod, which sounds like a far more genial, if less entertaining, Halloween tradition than fictional billionaire Mr. Burns's tradition of releasing the hounds.

Facebook's Royal Wedding [NY Times]