Wannabe Grandmas are Paying Big Bucks to Freeze Their Daughters' EggsS

We're living in the future, you guys: older women are freezing their 30-something daughters' eggs so that they can be grandchildren.

There are no solid statistics backing any of this up yet, but according to the New York Times, parents with childless daughters whose proverbial clocks are, in the words of one mother, "tick-tick-ticking," are offering to front thousands of dollars — the procedure typically costs between $8,000 and $18,000 — so that their daughters can one day bear (grand)children.

As one woman exclaimed after paying most of the $7,600 bill to freeze her daughter's eggs: "I have 26 grandbabies!"

Freezing one's eggs is as risky as it is expensive: there are no guarantees, which makes some health experts worry that it gives women a false sense of security. And others note that offering to freeze your daughter's eggs might come off a little pushy, to say the least. But all of the women interviewed for this article seemed happy that their parents offered to help them preserve their fertility; instead of feeling more pressure, they said they felt less.

One 39-year-old said she felt "this incredible calmness" after freezing her eggs. "No longer was I under such pressure that the next guy I dated would be daddy material," she said. Another explained that she felt uneasy about allowing her parents to pay for the procedure until they said, "Do you think we'd rather have this money sitting in an account or have a potential grandchild someday?" When they put it that way, it seemed like a sound decision, she said.

Researchers are only just begining to track the number of frozen-egg offspring, but some experts say it's currently around 2,000 worldwide. Will that number spike in the next decade or so? Moreover: If egg-freezing works as well as these women are hoping it does, will our baby-obsessed culture take it down a few notches? Now that might be too much to ask for.

So Eager for Grandchildren, They're Paying the Egg-Freezing Clinic [NYT]

Image via Tomislav Forgo /Shutterstock.