Badass Athlete Unleashes Vigilante Justice Against Her Facebook Stalker

A blundering idiot of a cyberstalker has found the tables turned on him after sending shots of his junk to an Olympic athlete, who in turned posted his name and email address on her Facebook page. Her move has ignited a debate on whether or not she was justified, but if you ask me, he's lucky that's all that she did.

Ariane Friedrich, a police officer by training, will likely contend for a pole vaulting medal during this summer's London Olympics. So when she received a sexually explicit proposition and a dirty picture from a fan over Facebook, she didn't take it lying down — she posted the man's name and information on her page and publicly rejected his proposal. She wrote, "There is simply a point where enough is enough. It's time to act, it's time to defend myself. And that is what I am doing. Nothing more and nothing less."

But! The plot thickens! Some in Germany say that her stunt circumvented the law, since in the German media, accused stalkers aren't named. Some of her Facebook fans think she was out of line, and the post has generated more than 10,000 comments (in German, natch) from fans and observers debating whether or not Friedrich was doing the right thing or demonstrating Olympic level wackness.

When you harass someone online, you should expect to forfeit your right to privacy. It's the same principle that dictates that if you're going to send naked pictures, go grin or go skin — but never send both, because you lose control of electronic communication once you hit "send." Society shouldn't embolden men like the one who harassed Friedrich; that sort of behavior should be shamed and eliminated. If it means public embarrassment for perpetrators, so be it.

Further, the man guilty of sending dick pics to Friedrich should be ashamed of his utter stupidity; if you're going to stalk and harass a woman online, don't stalk and harass an Olympic-level athlete with police training. That's just bad stalking form.

[NYT]