Abu Ghraib Torturer Says Detainees are Better Off Than She is

Remember Lynndie England, the young United States Army reservist who patrolled Abu Ghraib and posed, grinning, next next to hooded, naked detainees and dog-leash-tied prisoners? Seven years after being convicted in connection with a larger ring of torture and prisoner abuse at the Baghdad prison, she told The Daily that she doesn't regret her actions and that she thinks the detainees "got the better end of the deal."

"They weren't innocent," she said. "They're trying to kill us, and you want me to apologize to them? It's like saying sorry to the enemy."

England, now 29 with a felony on her record and a post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis, is clearly bitter: she was dishonorably discharged from the Army and can only find a job as a seasonal secretary in her hometown, where she lives with her parents and her 7-year-old son. Her former lover, the ringleader of the Abu Ghraib torture ring, refuses to support or acknowledge their child. England hasn't dated since Iraq, and she can't even indulge in her favorite hobby — hunting, naturally — since she's barred from carrying weapons. She has nothing much left other than to be increasingly paranoid. "You wonder why I'm always looking over my shoulder," she said. "It could be 20 years down the road. People wait. They have patience."

It's hard to feel much sympathy for a woman who once forced detainees to masturbate while she gave a gleeful "thumbs up" to the camera — especially since she clearly hasn't matured since the incident.

Abu Ghraib's grasp [The Daily]