Porn Producer Fights for Constitutional Right to Film Women Eating PoopS

The criminal proceedings against a porn producer behind such films as Japanese Doggy 3 Way, Gang Bang Horse "Pony Sex Game," Mako's First Time Scat, and Hollywood Scat Amateurs No. 7 have ended in mistrial after jurors couldn't decide whether or not some of his titles violated obscenity laws. The producer in question, Ira Isaacs, claims that his right to sell videos of women copulating with dogs and getting pooped on is protected by a little something called the constitution.

Isaacs has built a career making extreme fetish and beastiality films, and consequently, he's spent a great deal of time justifying the existence of those films as constitutionally protected art rather than useless-for-society obscenity. Legally, something violates obscenity laws if it is patently offensive and lacks serious political, scientific, or artistic value.

During the trial, Isaacs argued that he was an "artist" who simply creates art that makes people uncomfortable. And uncomfortable they were, as last week, the jurors, one of whom was wearing a Christmas sweater, sat agog during a courtroom screening of two of Isaacs' films— Japanese Doggy 3 Way, wherein a woman has sex with two dogs for 90 minutes, and Hollywood Scat Amateurs 7, wherein a woman smears herself with and eats what appears to be poop (it's actually a mixture of chocolate and peanut butter, with an agent in it to make it taste bitter so the actress makes faces as though it tastes bad).

The jury couldn't unanimously declare that Isaacs' films violated obscenity laws, and so a retrial has been scheduled for late April, when an entirely new set of horrified jurors will be treated to fake poop eating and dog screwing and debating whether or not Jefferson et al wanted future Americans to be able to watch films about women that are referred to as "toilets."

One nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Ira Isaacs Mistrial: Adult Film Producer Says his Videos are Constitutionally-Protected Art [HuffPo]