Ron Paul Actually Thought Those Racist Newsletters Were OK, After All

Even though Ron Paul's racist newsletters were published with Ron Paul's name on them and written in the first person, and even though Ron Paul has been filmed discussing his newsletters (which were terribly racist, anti-Semitic, and weird) in an interview, the GOP Presidential hopeful has disavowed knowledge of the its contents. But now, former employees are claiming that he was perfectly fine with what the newsletters said... and not for the reasons you might think.

The Washington Post is reporting that people closely associated with Ron Paul & Associates, the organization that published the infamous newsletters, have said that not only was Paul totally aware of what was being written under his byline, he was far from ignorant to the newsletters' contents and would actually sign off on every article.

Oopsie-daisy.

His former associates were careful to point out that Paul himself didn't seem to personally espouse the racism expressed in the newsletters, but he noticed that racist, tin foil hat-y stuff tended to do better with the newsletter-by-mail subscribing set than more libertarian, economy-focused material. He signed off on what he thought would sell best. Attempts to flirt with motifs of white power or rant about a coming race war weren't done for the love of the game, then, but for profit. Even if Ron Paul does not have a racist bone in his body, he likes money more than he dislikes racism and intolerance, which is a pretty damning character flaw in an elected official. And if what his former associates say is true, not only is Ron Paul okay with signing off on racism, he's a blatant panderer to the worst base of voters in the country— white supremacists who think Martin Luther King Jr was a pedophile.

For those who haven't had the pleasure, you can find nice, bite sized hunks of Ron Paul newsletter whackadoodlery at the Ron Paul Newsletters Twitter account, which tweets direct quotes from the publication. The quotes range from innocuous, possibly, depending on the context — "I can now give up my medical practice and dedicate every fiber of my being to saving the country"— to "what about the whites-style racism— "I'm sick of anti-Germanism, which is not— needless to say— a 'hate crime'"— to full on cuckoo bananas— "MLK was a flagrant plagiarist with a phony doctorate" and "People say the government should do more to stop AIDS. Actually it should do less and thereby help more."

Despite the fact that Paul's newsletters spit some pretty racist sounding game, it seems a little hollow now that we know that it was all an act designed to get attention. Ron Paul's a racist poseur, a mercenary hateboy. The Katy Perry of paranoia. But that doesn't make the Ron Paul Survival Report, or his association with it, any less fucked up.

Ron Paul signed off on racist newsletters, sources say [WaPo]