Kegels May Not Help Your Sex Life, But They Sure Can Calm Your Nerves

Over and over again, we've heard that Kegels are the answer to an awesome sex life. Ladymags urge us to do 'em at our desks! Squeezing makes for pleasing. But a small study in Brazil has found that Kegels might not do what everyone thinks they do.

According to My Health News Daily, a group of 32 postmenopausal women did a pelvic floor exercise regimen for three months. Twice a week, they had clinician-guided group exercise sessions; three times a week they did Kegels at home.

At the end of the three months, the researchers at São Paulo University measured stronger pelvic muscles in the women, and surveys showed a change in their moods.

Before the workouts, about 44 percent of the women reported having anxiety, compared with 28 percent who said so afterward.

However, the exercise regimen did not improve the women's sexual function, based on their answers to questions about their sexual interest, excitement and satisfaction.

Obviously there are so many factors to consider: Psychological/physioclogical problems, or the possibility that these women were sleeping with dudes who are bad in bed. Dr. Leah Millheiser, director of the Female Sexual Medicine Program at Stanford University School of Medicine, says: "A woman may have a perfectly working vagina but have a horrible sex life because of other issues."

But! With a 16% drop in anxiety, Kegels could be a cheap way to feel more relaxed. Forget anti-anxiety meds! Some Kegels, a nice red wine and a bubble bath, and you're good to go.

Pelvic Muscle Exercises Alone Fail to Improve Sex [My Health News Daily]