Pregnancé Came To Fashion Week, And Nobody CaredS

Yesterday, Pregnancé decided to go to some fashion shows. The gravid entertainer and her sister Solange attended Vera Wang, Rodarte, and the J. Crew presentation. They did not answer any questions, and security kept reporters at a distance. The Fug Girls report, "All of the editors seated on the front row across from her looked so tired and fashion show-ed out that you couldn't pay them to care that she was around." If pretending not to care about celebrities were a sport, fashion week would be its Olympic Games. [The Cut]


Pregnancé Came To Fashion Week, And Nobody CaredSTarget's website crashed yesterday, just minutes after the 6 a.m. launch of online sales of the Missoni for Target collection. (Target recently switched the administration of its web hosting and order fulfillment from outsourcing to Amazon to an in-house department.) The company said that its online traffic that morning outpaced even that seen during a typical Black Friday. Virtually every Missoni for Target item is now sold out online. Inevitably, at the time of this writing a search on "Missoni for Target" at eBay returns some 23,611 results. [WWD]
Pregnancé Came To Fashion Week, And Nobody CaredSHanneli Mustaparta and Shala Monroque are among the stars of Net-A-Porter's fall ad campaign. [WWD]
  • Amber Valletta stars in a Steven Klein video called Time Capsule that depicts the supermodel as she ages into her 80s. (The film is based on a spread Valletta and Klein did for W's September issue.) Valletta wasn't bothered by the idea of appearing aged. "If I look like that, I'd be cool with it," she said. "Both my grandmothers have aged amazingly and really still own their femininity. One is in her eighties and just found a boyfriend! It's just the idea of mortality that scares us, I guess." [Style.com]
  • W fashion director Edward Enninful says the first designer item he ever bought was a t-shirt. "When I was growing up in London, there was a designer called Katharine Hamnett, and she would make these t-shirts, and I bought one that said, 'No Nukes Is Good Nukes.' And, oh my God, I thought I was so stylish at the time." [The Cut]
  • There are rumors that Madonna is in talks to license a celebrity perfume. In other fragrance news, Marni is getting a perfume, and Tory Burch is said to be close to a deal with a perfume company. Women's Wear Daily calls Madonna "the Great White Whale of celebrities without a major fragrance deal." [WWD]
  • Wyclef Jean sat front-row at Donna Karan and it turns out that he has a rather unusual connection to the designer. He used to work as a security guard at one of the factories that produces Karan's clothing in New Jersey. "I feel asleep on a post and someone stole Donna Karan clothes," explained the musician. "So I said if I ever make it as a rock star I'm writing Donna Karan a check. So when I saw her I brought her a check." He said he did give her a check, for "Twenty." Twenty grand? Twenty dollars? The value of twenty bales of cotton? Inquiring minds need to know, Clef! [Fashionista]
  • Stella McCartney celebrated her 40th birthday with Kate Moss, Bono, and Sir Peter Blake. [Telegraph]
  • Speaking of art, Elle editor Joe Zee wrote an account of the first major art purchase he ever made — a David Hockney photomontage at an auction. "I saw, on the second floor, tucked away in a corner like a single girl at a party, a David Hockney photo montage titled Tea Time #3. Insignificant to some perhaps but to me, it symbolized everything I loved about photography: Simple, banal, easy, mundane, mesmerizing — and at that time, affordable (sort of). All reasons I needed to own that piece. That afternoon I registered for my first auction, placed a silent bid (super low compared to estimate) and forgot about it. Days later Christie's called me to say I had won the piece and today it hangs valiantly above my bed and remains one of my prized possessions. A few years later, I would also see another edition of the same work hanging proudly at LACMA's Hockney retrospective. My purchase was justified; that single party girl finally found a home." [Elle]
  • Seventeen-year-old Hudson Jeans spokestorso Patrick Schwarzenegger had to ask Maria Shriver for permission before sitting down for this interview — at which we imagine questions about his parents' separation were strictly proscribed. He nonetheless seems like a nice guy. [WWD]
  • Somebody named Thomas Jane (whom IMDB informs us was in Deep Blue Sea, God, remember Deep Blue Sea? "Because I carry a big stick and I'm the meanest mother fucker in the valley!") was seated front row at Hervé Leger by Max Azria. But then! Thomas Jane ran backstage just as the lights were going down. Halfway through the show, Jane sneaked back out onto the riser, made his way to the aisle nearest his former seat, and darted onto the runway while the models were walking on it to get back to his seat. Which had been filled — so he sat in that seat-filler's lap. We noticed a little commotion during the show; there was a "Ah!" from the crowd, but we couldn't see what had happened, so we assumed a model had taken a stumble. Walking onto the runway during a show — does it even need to be said? — is a Fashion Don't. We'd say this was a most extraordinary violation of the dignity of the Hervé Leger by Max Azria show, but it was the Hervé Leger by Max Azria show, so. (By the way, we noticed precisely three models of color in the cast out of the total thirty. Great stuff as usual from Max Azria, the king of diversity in fashion.) [The Cut]
  • Gilles Mendel postponed his fashion show by one day in order to attend the National Design Awards, where Michelle Obama named him the winner in the fashion design category. The other nominees were Prabal Gurung and Jason Wu. Obama said, "Good design is good citizenship. These men and women have breathed new life into our homes and our workplaces, the clothes we wear, the products we use every day and even the most basic ways we process information...A trip to the park is just a bit more refreshing. A book or a chart more readable. A commute to work more palatable, unless you were stuck on the train today. But while we ooh and ahh at their handiwork, we may take for granted all the blood, sweat and tears that went into the process of creation. We will never see all of those late nights spent tinkering and perfecting. We'll never experience the long hours hunched over a drafting board or staring blankly at a computer screen. So, honorees, today is about honoring not just your designs but also the years of hard work that brought you here today." [WWD]