According to findings published in the journal Nature, over two million years ago, it was actually more common for "pre-human" females to uproot from their birth homes in search of an ideal mate than it was for men to do so.

But that's not all. Once they found said mate, he stayed home with the kids (or with their possessions, at least):

The differences in mineral variation between the male and female teeth have paleontologists believing that women were charged with leaving the nest, while the men stayed behind holding down the fort.

Granted, from an evolutionary stand-point, these women were probably leaving their hometowns to avoid inbreeding, but still. Any information that even slightly disproves the "gender roles are in our DNA" theory, is always a welcome addition to the conversation.

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Cavewomen were the first explorers, says study. Origin of wanderlust explained. [Yahoo]