Far too rarely does fashion ask the question, 'What would happen if a bunch of FLDS children hung out with a bunch of goths in an old AOL chat room?' Luckily, for that we have a little magazine called Dis.

At first, naturally, the members of the two groups regard one another with suspicion.

The story was shot by Marco Roso and styled by Lauren Boyle.

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For some reason, this kid is my favorite.

It may be current events talking, but I automatically take this as a commentary on Warren Jeffs, Mormon fundamentalism, and the Yearning For Zion ranch.

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The New York Times should have interviewed these kids for their trend piece on the cultural implications of ripped clothing (which was invented by Rodarte in 2008, as you might have known).

"Why are you looking at my hair like that?"

"Why are you looking at my hair like that?"

But these crazy kids manage to bond.

Over shoes!

How do you think you get Chucks on Spice Girls-style ankle-breaker platforms like that? Is there a custom platform guy you can take your shoes to, and he Frankensteins them out?

Oh hai.

I went to a very small Montessori primary school run out of an old Victorian house in downtown Christchurch, New Zealand, for a while as a child, and one of my teachers had hair that she styled exactly like the redhead model. She scared me, a little.

She's getting it.

Dis creates fashion stories that are striking for their irreverence and their strong visuals even as they tweak the fashion media's preference for inventing inane trends, and the portmanteau neologisms they use to describe them — like Dis's story on MANicures, or their take on the "Summer Trends" editorial every ladymag does. "Lizzie wears a Midsummer's Night-scented Yankee Candle Neck Charm. Freshen up your look and that smoggy SoCal air."

But...will the goths accept them?

Yes. Yes they will. Now these teenagers are ready to unite against their common enemy: adults who don't like the way they dress.

Laura Ashley (31) [Dis Magazine]