Christy Turlington Hated The CatwalkS

  • Christy Turlington says, "There's nothing rewarding about modeling. It was a fun opportunity that allowed me to see the world but spiritually and intellectually there is nothing rewarding about the profession at all."
  • The supermodel, promoting her documentary No Woman, No Cry, mused on the changing industry and the contrast between working as a model, and her newer roles as documentarian, master's candidate in public health, and maternal health advocate. She says the latter is infinitely more rewarding than, you know, being a supermodel. "Look, a lot more positive things than negative came out of it and I'm proud that I'm still working now, whenever it makes sense." And how was it, back then? "I often felt that we were too glamorous. Because I'm not very glamorous it didn't feel true to me. I relate far more to the fashion of today than the Chanel miniskirts and Versace jackets of that time. Plus, having to wear all that make-up — what a waste!" Turlington also "hated" walking on the catwalk. "I remember doing a shoot for Herb Ritts, hanging off the Eiffel Tower — that wasn't your usual day at the office. It was terrifying and in the end you couldn't really tell how high I was because the photographer was scared of heights so he was quite far away from me. It only happened rarely, but sometimes you did feel that you were contributing to a piece of art." [Telegraph]
  • Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony shot a campaign for Gucci, which is launching a children's line in the fall, and they allowed their kids to be photographed. However, they insisted the twins' faces not be visible. [NYDN]
  • Madonna is directing a movie based on the story of King Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson. After having asked Stephen Jones to design the hats for the film, "and somehow I've ended up starring in it, too," says the milliner. [Vogue UK]
  • In addition to the CBS one-hour special on Fashion's Night Out set to air this September, the retail drunkathon will be part of a plot on Gossip Girl. Lauren Santo Domingo and Hamish Bowles just filmed cameos for the latter. [NYPost]
  • Meanwhile, Anna Wintour very nicely asked Condé Nast's summer interns to volunteer for the Fashion's Night Out opening ceremony, which reportedly includes a 250 models-strong fashion show featuring outfits inspired by different New York neighborhoods. Sounds like a Project Runway challenge. [WWD]
  • Speaking of which, we definitely all need a $25 Tim Gunn bobblehead doll that says, "Fab-u-lous!" and "Make it work!" in our lives. [WWD]
  • Daphne Guinness wore a fluffy, silver catsuit to the opening of the London Acne store. And sunglasses. And enormous black shoes. But she loves Acne. "I love them because I think they keep it real. I'm thrilled they've opened a store here in London. There are so many mirrors in here — it's beautiful." [Vogue UK]
  • The store is adorned with two large sculptures of eagles, by former designer Helmut Lang. [WWD]
  • Three words: Lady Gaga Glasses. [ONTD]
  • New mum Jourdan Dunn is all over the new Victoria's Secret catalog. With seven angels currently or very recently pregnant, soon functioning ovaries will probably be a job requirement. [The Cut]
  • Kristen McMenamy and her waist-length iron-grey hair star in an editorial for the August issue of American Vogue — and McMenamy made the cover of Dazed & Confused, too. [Models]
  • Versace's fall campaign features Iselin Steiro, Valerija Kelava, and Anna Selezneva. The three are shot by Mario Testino, presumably with a wide-angle lens; they have that bobblehead look. [SB]
  • Knockoff emporium Forever 21 is beginning the difficult task of convincing designers to launch collaborations. Their first guinea pig? Brian Lichtenberg, whose caution-tape outfit Lady Gaga customized in the "Telephone" video. He's sticking to printed t-shirts for his Forever 21 line. [WWD]
  • Meanwhile, Wet Seal is taking advantage of the down real estate market to experiment with a new denim store chain called Blink. The company is signing one-year leases, and the first Blink store opened on July 3. [WWD]
  • Alexis Maybank, Gilt Groupe co-founder, on getting financial backing: "I had worked [in investment banking] so I understood how it worked. At investor meetings where we pitched the idea, not a single firm had a female partner. So when explaining fashion to a bunch of men in khaki pants and blue button-down shirts, their response was always 'Oh, let me see if my wife thinks if this is a good idea.' But it worked." Three cheers for bankers' wives, then. No cheers for sexism. [WSJ]
  • About that alleged tax evasion, Dirk Bikkembergs — who is accused by Italy's tax service of hiding revenue in Luxembourg — says the allegations are "shameful towards a foreign investor" who has "attempted to set up a part of its business in Italy, not to mention the damage to the reputation of a designer who has done much to contribute to the local economy." [WWD]
  • Jason Wu, Mary Katrantzou, Adam Kimmel, Damir Doma, Juun J, and Duro Olowu are among the finalists for this year's Swiss Textiles Award. The prestigious international design competition awards a hefty stipend and major industry cred to one emerging designer; last year's winner was Alexander Wang and previous winners include Rodarte and Bruno Pieters. [Vogue UK]
  • Peace, Love & Juicy Couture is Juicy Couture's latest perfume, set to launch everywhere in September. [WWD]
  • Also in September, Prada is launching an eau-de-toilette version of its popular 2007 perfume, Infusion D'Iris. [WWD]
  • Not to be outdone, this fall Chanel will begin selling a new men's scent, Bleu de Chanel. [WWD]
  • Jesus. Three pairs of boots, $900-$2,095, and they are all ugly. [TLF]
  • Lanvin is being strangely "cagey" about the opening of its third U.S. store, and its first in New York. (It is also the first American opening that designer Alber Elbaz will attend.) But it is believed to be happening next week. [NYPost]
  • The Wall Street Journal's glossy style supplement, WSJ., seems to be losing its top two editors. Tina Gaudoin resigned "for personal reasons" in June, and has returned to London. Meanwhile, her deputy, Owen Phillips, is leaving for the Hollywood Reporter. Marie Claire editor Joanna Coles, T online editor Horacio Silva, and the former editor of now-defunct Domino, Deborah Needleman, are said to be amongst the candidates for the vacant positions. [WWD]
  • Retailers expect back-to-school sales to rise 5.4% on last year, after two years of successive declines. [WWD]
  • Alice + Olivia designer Stacey Bendet is a vegan. Who wears fur. She wore a Mongolian lamb fur vest of her own design to an event. "I don't put meat in my body. So every once in a while I think it's okay to wear it. But I made it — I'm probably going to hell. I don't feel that guilty wearing it. I don't know why. It doesn't make sense. But something about putting it inside me feels really barbaric. Something about wearing it just feels a little glamorous." [The Cut]
  • A Harvard Business School professor has written a book entitled, Beauty Imagined: A History of the Global Beauty Industry. [WWD]
  • Meanwhile, in an unexpected move, the cosmetics industry's main lobbying group has asked Congress for more regulation. Watchdog groups and the media are increasingly holding perfumes and cosmetics up to scrutiny, amid allegations that some common ingredients are carcinogenic or otherwise harmful. [WWD]
  • For less well-endowed drunks: a sports bra that holds a bottle of wine in two strategically placed plastic bladders. At last, now women shall have the freedom to drink from our own breasts. Only $29.95. [NYDN]