Sarah Palin Boob-Job Rumors Persist • Domestic Abuse Rises During World Cup

• A source close to Sarah Palin has come out to defend the former governor against boob job allegations. "It's absolutely ridiculous," she tells US Magazine. Unfortunately, Palin or her reps could not be reached for comment.

But, on the bright side, there are plenty of insights from the peanut gallery of women who have had implants. Let's continue to hash and rehash! • Ben Roethlisberger issued an apology yesterday to the team's fans, which comes months after he was accused of sexually assaulting a woman in a Georgia nightclub. The quarterback told the press: "I've wanted to apologize for so many things. For being immature, for being dumb, for being young, not knowing any better, for getting caught up with everything that was still in my way." He also admits he "hasn't been the best person," which may be putting it kind of lightly. • If you think Roman Polanski's supporters are bad, here is another case to get your blood boiling: Ilya Trushevsky, an artist who has admitted to beating and raping a 17-year-old girl, was just awarded the Moral Support Prize from the Winzavod Contemporary Art Center. Basically, the "prize" goes to an artist to remind the public that artists stick together, or something, even when the man in question has publicly mocked his victim and openly admitted guilt. • WTF Headline of The Day: "Knox Family Have Never Said Sorry." Relatives of the convicted murder have not yet contacted the family of Meredith Kercher directly, though they have tried to "express our condolences and our sorrow" through interviews. Since the Knox family maintains that Amanda is innocent, this actually makes a lot of sense. Plus, that sounds like one uncomfortable phone call. • The daughter of the so-called "Brazilian Fritzl" says she forgives her father for imprisoning her for 12 years and fathering seven children with her. Investigators say she is afraid that, if he is imprisoned, she will no longer be able to take care of their seven children. She also explained that she never rejected his sexual advances because she feared he would abandon her and the children. • According to data from the U.S. census, almost half the births in the past twelve months have been to minority families. Non-Hispanic whites still account for 51.4% of all births, down from 55% last year. • Earlier this month, a group of pastors and church members gathered outside Governor Sean Parnell's office in Anchorage. They were there to pray - and to protest his veto of a bill that would provide state funding for abortion and expand the Denali KidCare program. In striking down the bill, Parnell took a swing not only at abortion, but also at the health of many low-income kids. • A recent poll found that Obama holds an edge over each of his potential Republican challengers in 2012. If we were to vote now, Huckabee could garner only 44%, to Obama's 46%, while Mitt Romney would probably pull in only 42. However, the national survey only looked at 650 adults, so we're inclined to think it might not be the best predictor. • Even though abortions may soon be offered in military hospitals to service women (who have to pay out of pocket, natch), there is still a huge stigma against the procedure. "The military doesn't forgive you," said one unmarried former Marine. "You're never going to get promoted again." • The 23-year-old Portland man accused of surreptitiously cutting women's hair on city buses has been sentenced to two years, four months in prison. If this seems harsh, that's because it's not all for the haircuts: He pleaded guilty to witness tampering after he was caught trying to coach his girlfriend on her testimony. • New research out of Scotland indicates that some 97.5 % of adults in the country have habits or lifestyles that are dangerous to their health. Two-thirds of the population is overweight or obese, and most people have a poor diet, claims the study. And since the data is based on self-reporting, the real situation could be worse. • An expert in women's health from the University of London is urging victims of domestic violence to make preparations for increased abuse during the nights of the World Cup. Professor Paula Nicolson suggests victims arrange for a place to sleep on certain nights, and avoid consuming any alcohol themselves. • Currently, Nicaraguan law prohibits abortion under any and all circumstances. Even underage rape victims are forced to bear any child they may conceive. Though the United Nations has suggested they change their stance, Nicaraguan lawmakers have held firm. Recently, Amnesty International entered the debate, calling the total ban "appalling" and "cruel." • On Friday, Iceland's parliament unanimously passed a law that will allow same-sex partners to get married. Iceland's protestant church has not yet decided whether they will allow gay marriages within the church, and the bill states that "ministers will always be free to perform marriage ceremonies, but never obliged to." • Daylife! It's like nightlife, only it happens during the day. Naturally, this is a Vegas thing. •