Cruz & Kruger Corral Campaigns; Anarchists Attack American ApparelS

  • And in other celebrity endorsement news, Vanessa Paradis picked up where Lily Allen left off as the face of Chanel's Cocoon handbags. [SB]
  • Apparently Lindsay Lohan is being sued by a fashion photographer named Scott Nathan, whom she hired to take photos of her in her 6126 clothing. Nathan says he was promised a 1% stake in the line as payment, but that he hasn't received anything. Perhaps 6126 is just a bad investment? [Daily Express]
  • Britney Spears "designed" a "limited-edition" range for Candie's, the shoe brand she represents. And she's shooting the campaign for her collection, naturally. [@BritneySpears]
  • "It's still a novelty — when you see someone you don't know on the street wearing a piece you've designed, that really is something," says Yasmin Le Bon, on her clothing collection for Wallis. "It makes me glow a bit. Then I have to give myself a good slap round the face." [ToL]
  • "You know that these celebrities haven't designed any of it. They have taken things out of their wardrobes — by Balenciaga or some other brand — and had it knocked up by the chain," says Zandra Rhodes, who's always good for a quote. Or two: "I never consciously tried to shock, whereas I do think that Vivienne Westwood's fame has been about doing that on purpose." Or three: "I wouldn't mind being made a Dame. Vivienne is one, after all." [Telegraph]
  • Thierry Mugler — who makes Marc Jacobs or Karl Lagerfeld-style bodily transformation seem like the work of amateurs — is a complicated individual. [NYTimes]
  • "I am not interested in fashion, only in clothes," says Ralph Lauren. [ToL]
  • Madonna paired an eyepatch with a lace glove in the new issue of Interview. [Just Jared]
  • Michelle Obama wore Prabal Gurung, and some really expensive-sounding jeweled cuffs, to the White House Correspondents Dinner. [Mrs O]
  • Suzy Menkes reviews the Met's Costume Institute exhibit, "American Woman: Fashioning A National Identity," and mis-spells the First Lady's name: "Except that a final, digitalized room brings the story into the 21st century, with rotating projections of influential women from Serena Williams to Michele Obama." [International Herald Trib]
  • Judith Thurman, in the New Yorker, gives a more considered account of the show: "If one looks too closely at any symbolic antithesis (Diana versus Venus) it dissolves into a multitude of contradictions: Americans did dominate high fashion in the first half of the twentieth century, but only to the extent that haute couture was dependent on dollars and a cabal of Francophile magazine editors in New York. American fashion and feminism have intersected, especially in the past thirty years, but often uneasily, if not as antagonists. And high style wasn't native to the New World. The apostles of what [curator Andrew] Bolton calls 'Americanness' in dress, from Levi Strauss to Ralph Lauren, have often been Jewish immigrants, or their children. (Today, many are Asian and Latino.) A more accurate subtitle for the Met show might be 'Borrowing a National Identity.'" [New Yorker]
  • Helena Christensen is inexplicably naked in an ad for Reebok's version of those sneakers that claim to tone your legs even as you walk. [Vogue UK]
  • Now come the inevitable How Helena Works Out! articles. [Sun]
  • A blind item: "Which designer who recently died was HIV+ and was distraught over the fact he had infected at least four other people?" ONTD is guessing Alexander McQueen; we've heard this rumor since his death. [Crazy Days And Nights]
  • Miss Selfridge, with the co-operation/assent of Gossip Girl costume designer Eric Daman, has launched a collection of clothing inspired by the show. [ONTD]
  • Your Mom, The Style Icon. Writes the Times of London's Shane Watson, on Stella McCartney and summer trends: "Stella has pulled off something much bigger than a mere 1970s revival: she's got us all dreaming about being a woman like Linda — a wholesome, free-spirited, nut roast-cooking, home-schooling type with a conscience and a make-up-free kind of sexiness. Your mum (so long as it's the right mum) is the surprise icon of summer." [ToL]
  • Martha Stewart talked Tory Burch through some of her old modeling photos, including shots from Ms and Glamour. Says the Stewart: "Modeling was great. I met all these great photographers and paid my way through Barnard College. At the same time as all of this I was in college. We did it all. Women today seem to have a harder time doing it all...It's hard but we managed. And we still cooked." Burn, modern, unable-to-have-it-all-and-also-cook women. Burn like your attempts at dinner. [Cheap Girl]
  • Designer Matthew Williamson shot some Polaroids of Lady Gaga for V magazine. [Design Scene]
  • Kate Moss wore a diamond ring out and about, fuelling rumors that she is secretly engaged to Jamie Hince. [Daily Express]
  • Marc Jacobs and Lorenzo Martone are not only together but said to be mulling matching tattoos. [Style.com]
  • "Girls have been wearing trousers since the 1920s, so I found it really shocking that it was still an issue," says Helmut Lang, who sold his namesake line five years ago, and is now gifting most of his archives to various European museums. "It was like when Stella Tennant appeared on the runway for the first time and they all said that she was this androgynous woman. I thought, how weird. She's a really great looking woman. What's androgynous about her? That she doesn't have long hair? In the end, I do think it's insulting to men and women to insist that they fit a certain profile. I never understood that." [Independent]
  • Some really pathetic anarchists on a protest march down Broadway allegedly broke several windows at an American Apparel store; hipsters, including one sanctimonious dude in red sunglasses, gave chase and called the police. Both sides here are terrible. [Gothamist]
  • Jean-Louis Dumas, the head of Hermès, one of the last family-run luxury companies, died in Paris this weekend. He was 72. Expect tussles over succession. [WSJ]
  • Calvin Klein has a new style of men's skinny jeans that are designed to enhance the wearer's, ahem, "profile." [WWD]
  • O.J. Simpson's Armani acquittal suit — rejected by the Smithsonian — is now in the possession of the Newseum. [AP]
  • Eugena from Cycle 7 of ANTM booked a Clinique cosmetics TV ad. [ONTD]
  • For some reason, the New York Times chose now to run a story about the closure of Maria Pinto's business — some three months after it happened. It has no new information, unless you count the fact that Pinto, who once dressed the First Lady, intends to take up yoga and gardening as new information. [NYTimes]
  • British women have such immense knockers that Debenhams now sells bras in a KK cup. [411]
  • Samantha Harris, a 19-year-old model of Aboriginal descent, is featured on the June cover of Vogue Australia, and will be walking in nearly 20 shows at Australian fashion week. Expect her international career to get a boost. [SMH]
  • John Varvatos is displaying some Saturday Night Live guest host portraits from the past ten years at his downtown boutique, which is where CBGB's used to be. [Refinery29]
  • Mongolian designer Tsolmandakh Munkhuu painted all of his models pitch-black head-to-toe for his most recent runway show. [ASVOF]
  • Jones Apparel Group is said to be interested in acquiring a stake in Stuart Weitzman. [WWD]
  • Here are some photos of Karl Lagerfeld's studio in Paris. [The Selby]
  • Could this tattoo of an Alexander McQueen alien shoe possibly be real? Your takes in the comments. [Fashin]