Is The Era Of Implants Over In Hollywood?

Though it was once considered fairly standard for actresses to increase her busts via the magic of plastic surgery, Sally Brampton of the Daily Mail notes that studios are now calling for "authenticity," when it comes to women's bodies.

"Plastic, it seems, is no longer fantastic," Brampton writes, pointing to a recent Disney-ban on implants for the next Pirates of the Caribbean film, the drop in interest in plastic surgery makeover shows like The Swan and Victoria Beckham's removal of her implants as a sign that Hollywood, and perhaps the world in general, has tired of the overtly-fake implant look. "That's why, for women in the public eye, " Brampton writes, "having fake breasts is looking increasingly less like a career move and more like career suicide."

Keep in mind that Brampton, who claims to have "naturally" large breasts and makes a point to note that the downsides of having an ample chest—including back pain and issues with dealing with men—aren't spoken about as much as they should be, is speaking more about the celebrity obsession with breast implants than breast implants in general; there are, of course, many women who undergo breast augmentation for personal reasons that have nothing to do with wanting to become famous by increasing their cup size.

Still, Brampton's overall point, that obvious plastic surgery is becoming increasingly passe and unmarketable in Hollywood, doesn't seem to factor in the flip side of celebrity culture, that someone like Heidi Montag, for example, who seems to have no actual marketable skills whatsoever, can now use her obsession with plastic surgery as a means to try to cling to whatever small bit of fame she has left. While "serious" actresses might be gravitating toward "authenticity," the wannabes of the world might attempt to run in the opposite direction, become as inauthentic (and proudly so) as possible to stand out and make a name for themselves.

It's also very unlikely that in an image-obsessed industry like Hollywood, implants themselves will suddenly disappear; if anything, they'll simply become less noticeable, or perhaps more natural-looking. Or, you know, everyone will follow Marion Cotillard's lead and just start strapping them to their foreheads.

Fake Boobs: They're Banned By Disney, Posh Has Ditched Hers, And Today's Young Women Think They're Naff [DailyMail]

Earlier: Cotillard Combats Sexism With Forehead Breasts

Related: Disney Bans Fake Boobs From Pirates [Gawker]