Females Won't Call Friends Fat • Haitian Judge To Release Most U.S. Missionaries

• Oh, brother: a survey found that one in five women think their BF is fat, but would never say this out loud. And a "mere" one in four females has "plucked up the courage" to advise a diet. •

We're not sure why it suddenly became our job to police the weight of our friends, but the Express is concerned. "So it seems we can't even rely on our best friends to tell us when it's time to quit the cupcakes," writes Kate Bally. • The New York City health department has issued a warning regarding the use of the morning sickness "remedy" calabash clay, which is also known as nzu, poto, calabar stone, mabele, argile or la craie. The chalk-like substance is particularly popular in West African communities, but authorities have found that it often contains both lead and arsenic. • Exciting news: for the first time in 400 years, Shakespeare's Globe Theater in London will present a play by a female author. The chosen script is "Bedlam," by Nell Leyshon. The Times notes that although this is a long time coming, the Globe was closed down by the puritans in 1642 and only reopened in 1997. • The West Hollywood city counsel is expected to pass an ordinance this week that would ban the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores. Hollywood lawmakers have a pretty good relationship already with their pets; over a decade ago, laws were rewritten to replace "pet" with "companion" and "owner" with "guardian." • One of the 10 Americans being held in Haiti on charges of kidnapping was taken to a hospital on Wednesday, sources said. She is reportedly a diabetic and "in a lot of pain." In other news, a Haitian judge ruled today that some of the Americans will be allowed to go home, although he did not specify who will be released. • Female jurors are more likely to change their minds upon entering the jury room, according to a new study on gender and jurors. Women started out tougher on the defendant at the beginning of the process, but were more likely to be persuaded to change their minds by the end of the experiment. • A study of over 4,000 women found that breast cancer survivors who take Aspirin regularly are less likely to die from a recurrence of the disease. Taking Aspirin 6 to 7 times a week lessens the risk by 64%. • Sarah Palin is never going away, ever. At least, that's what we gleaned from this analysis of Twitter trending topics. •