Lindsay Does Good With Leggings; Posh's Old Modeling Pictures Surface

  • For a limited time, Lindsay Lohan will donate 100% of the proceeds from her "Fame" leggings to Haiti, via Save the Children. The leggings are on sale. Is she trying to move old stock by appealing to people's charity? [People]
  • Naomi Campbell and Sarah Brown, meanwhile, are co-hosting a charity fashion show the day before London Fashion Week opens, also to benefit Haiti. [Fashionista]
  • Tilda Swinton explains the inspiration for her and Ryan McGinley's film advertising Pringle of Scotland: "The whole concept of nature" and "rebirth" and Henri Cartier-Bresson. [ToL]
  • "The ethical dropout," Kanye West, and "his sleazy companion," Amber Rose, have been predictably and oh-so-originally slammed by PETA for wearing floor-length fur coats to the shows in Paris. [PETA]
  • We can't stop staring at this photo of Claudia Schiffer taking West and Rose's picture in Chanel's front row. Neither is smiling. [WWD]
  • Adam Lambert, on his style: "What I do has been done before. It's glam. I'm inspired by the '70s and '80s. Bowie is a huge influence. So are hair bands. Why must a crazy look necessarily be gay?" Adam continued. "Our society is more fearful, I guess. And they don't party enough. Everyone was partying in the '80s." [VMan via JustJared]
  • It's been three weeks, and astoundingly, Weatherproof's unauthorized attempt to turn Barack Obama into a spokesmodel is still hanging in Times Square. The giant "A Leader In Style" ad — which the company promised to remove back on January 8 — has already spawned a parody billboard for the show Breaking Bad. (In it, actor Bryan Cranston poses against the Great Wall, wearing a gas mask, under the taglines "YouGotNoProof" and "A Dealer In Style.") And the best part is, Weatherproof would like to replace Obama with none other than Sarah Palin. Apparently the hold-up is that this time, they're asking permission. [NYTimes]
  • "Armani is what you wear when you want to feel a little more protected by your dress," says Anne Hathaway. Tina Turner joined the actress in the front row. [WWD]
  • Anna Wintour, Hamish Bowles, and Carine Roitfeld took the opportunity of couture week to have a meeting with the French minister of industry, Christian Estrosi, about France's support of emerging fashion talents — or lack thereof. (Wintour said last month, "When France is so known for its fashion industry — for them not to be reaching out to help younger people today is really a shame.") "She's right," said Estrosi, who announced that there will soon be a French master's degree equivalent in fashion design, to enable students to better compete internationally, and that the government will exempt fashion houses from the 35-hour workweek during the run-up to fashion weeks. [WSJ]
  • The minister also announced a new "fashion bank," which would mingle private financing with government guarantees, at least for certain loans. [Telegraph]
  • Looks like one of Victoria Beckham's prehistoric teenaged modeling test shoots turned up in the wash. [Radaronline]
  • Speaking of singer/models, here in this spring Mango campaign is none other than Sophie Auster, daughter of authors Paul Auster and Siri Hustvedt. We don't know how we missed this particular example of literary fameballing when the campaign broke last week. [WWD]
  • But getting back to Posh: we thought "random businessmen offering celebrities obscene amounts of money, like $25 million, to lend their names to stupid hotels in Dubai" was one of the things the recession was going to kill. For good. [Elle UK]
  • Pierre Hardy is continuing its collaboration with Gap for the spring and summer. [Nitrolicious]
  • Alessandro Dell'Acqua says his new line, No. 21, will be cheaper than his last by about 25%. "I looked back at what I did in the past and decided to put the focus on wearable, everyday clothes more than on eveningwear," explained the designer, who lost the rights to his own name in a dispute with his label's owners. [WWD]
  • Think that organic cotton t-shirt is for real? Think again. An investigation by the Financial Times of Germany has uncovered fraud on a "gigantic scale" in the certification of organic cotton originating from India. India is the world's largest supplier of organic cotton. The FT tested the "organic" cotton in garments from major retailers like H&M, and found that 30% in fact contained some genetically modified cotton fibers. The Indian agricultural ministry has apparently fined the main organic certification agencies, like EcoCert, for perpetrating fraud as recently as April of last year. But companies also need to be more vigilant over their supply chains. H&M admitted it became aware of the cotton problem last year. So why did it continue selling cotton marked as organic, that it had reason to suspect might not be? [Ecouterre]
  • There's speculation that Gucci will add a couture line — although probably not on the official couture week schedule. [Elle UK]
  • "Neon Baroque" was the makeup inspiration at Chanel's couture show, which sounds exciting in theory. In practice, it apparently means pink lips and giant subdivided poufs of hair, to give a sort of heart-shaped silhouette. [WWD]
  • "Every single girl wants to look her best that day and she wants to look romantic. This is what my work is all about," says Oscar de la Renta. Which is why he took it upon himself to design a $13,000 wedding dress exclusively for Bergdorf Goodman. [WWD]
  • You know, if we were police officers in the Milwaukee area who suspected certain local stores of selling counterfeit Nike Air Force Ones, and we were planning a sting operation with marked bills, controlled buys, and surveillance to bust those particular stores, we might not tell the media about it until afterwards. [UPI]
  • Something about the very idea of an 85,000 square foot Forever 21 gives us the heebie-jeebies. The music! The crowds! [WWD]
  • But not as much as the thought of Chanel raising its prices on February 1 by $50-$100, just because it can. [Madison Avenue Spy]