White House Crashers Lose Watch To Landscaper, Further Rile Cheerleaders

The latest on the most ridiculous couple in the nation: now they've got cheerleaders, tax authorities and their landscaper mad at them. "We are all fortunate that this diplomatic celebration did not become a night of horror," says one politico:

The buck has - almost - stopped. Or at least scapegoated: A secret service officer judged responsible for the security breach that allowed national laughingstocks Tareq and Michaele Salahi to crash a state dinner have been put on leave. End of it? Everyone wishes. Says the Wall Street Journal,

"We are all fortunate that this diplomatic celebration did not become a night of horror," said Rep. Bennie Thompson (D., Miss.), chairman of the panel. Committee Republicans stepped up criticism of the Obama administration's social secretary, Desiree Rogers, saying she should be subpoenaed to answer questions about her staff's role in the lapse. Committee Democrats rebuffed calls to compel Ms. Rogers to testify. The White House has said Ms. Rogers won't appear before the committee.

And cheerleaders for the Washington Redskins are also all steamed up - since, allegedly, Mrs. Salahi participated in a Sept. 20 halftime show with a bunch of former Redskins cheerleaders, with cameras in tow, claiming to be a former member of the squad. (That's her with them) But, as the Washington Post reports, the squad became suspicious when "Salahi couldn't perform some of the basic cheerleader routines, including the standard choreography for the team's fight song, "Hail to the Redskins." And, sure enough, she proved to be an impostor.

The Washington Redskins Cheerleaders Alumni Association lists Salahi on its membership roster and indicates that she was a cheerleader during 1991 season under her nickname and maiden name, Missy Holt. However, when asked by the group for proof of her participation, Salahi was unable to supply any...The group's president, Terri Lamb, said Wednesday, "We have no record that she ever was a Redskins cheerleader. She was listed on our 1991 roster at Ms. Salahi's request and based on her misrepresentation to us."

The collective shenanigans have resulted in a formal investigation by Virginia's Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services into the Salahis' vague business, America's Polo Cup, which raises funds fur charitable works. The Salahis claim that "National Polo League" officially sanctions their org; the shallowest of digging raised doubts about the National Polo League's actual existence. In other news, the Salahis still owe money to a landscaper, who took them to court: in lieu of cash, reports the WaPo, Tareq left a Patek Philippe watch that, according to a witness, "makes a Rolex look like a Swatch."

By now it should be pretty obvious that the couples' self-promotion may verge on pathology and blur the "con" line. Clearly, they're pros. Which makes the continued bile being directed at Desiree Rogers that much more confusing. While it's true that her failure to answer questions of the congressional probe looks high-handed (all the more so when one of her deputies is taking the fall) Peter King's accusations of "stonewalling" are somewhat incendiary and more than a little politically-charged.


Officers Put On Leave Over Crashing of Party
[Wall Street Journal]
Cheerleaders Get Fired Up About Salahi [Washington Post]
W.H. Accused Of 'Stonewalling' [PoliticoIn Court, Salahis Agree To Settle Debt With Watch [Washington Post]