Can Facebook Make Or Break Your Social Life?S

A researcher says failing to reveal details of your private life on networking sites such as Facebook is ''tantamount to social suicide.'' I'm just not buying it.

Matthew Myron has written a book called What Is Privacy? which, according to the Telegraph, states: ''Many people feel they have to be a part of Facebook to socialize. Such sites are the modern equivalent of a mobile phone. They have grown into fashion accessories and they are a must-have for people who don't want to be social outcasts."

It's understandable that people feel that way, but "social outcast" is taking it a bit far. I have friends who are not on Facebook and manage to (gasp!) have a social life. It was possible to socialize before Facebook. Before MySpace, before Twitter, before email, before text messaging, even. And this may sound impossible, but people talked to each other before the telephone was invented!

We have become a culture of convenience… and of showing off. It's easier to post a picture of your new baby on Facebook as a way of introducing her to your friends and acquaintances than to have everyone come over, and if your friends and acquaintances comment, "she's adorable!" for everyone to see, they feel that they've done their duty in keeping the friendship alive. But if you're not on Facebook to have these digital exchanges, is your social life over? Or do you just find different ways to communicate? Myron says: ''To fit in, you have to be open and display all." I just don't agree. Even though I work online, have a Facebook page and a Twitter, I don't tend to "socialize" that way. I hate evites; my Facebook doesn't include a lot of personal information. I am more likely to text or call people I want to speak to. Is Facebook fun? Yes. Is it addictive? Sometimes. Is it necessary? I think not.

Failing To Disclose Private Life On Facebook 'Is Social Suicide' [Telegraph]