Women's Website Discovers Secret To Wearing Heels, But Science Knows Better

Ever since I broke my foot four years ago, I don't really wear heels anymore. But that doesn't mean I don't get blisters. Luckily, blisterenterolgists at The Frisky are on the case.

The Frisky's Leonora Epstein writes,

You wear your new super hot, strappy high heels and the next day your feet look like they've been in the boxing ring. Then, the only way to wear your shoes again is to protect your wounds with band-aids that slip out of place, or you end up taking them off anyhow because they're so unsightly and you're wincing every time you take a step.

Foot-boxing actually sounds kind of fun, and a better reason to get a foot injury than ill-fitting shoes. But no matter, the solution to all podiatric problems is ... Nexcare Clear First Aid Tape! Yes, just tape over those seeping wounds and strap your hot high heels right back on again. The Frisky calls this "tip" (originally from Teen Vogue) an "amazing insider fashion secret."

Of course, this "insider secret" can be found in any drugstore, but more to the point, if your shoes make your feet bleed, just don't wear them for a while! Or do as I did the last time a pair of peep-toe flats made my feet an oozy mess (damn you, Paris Hilton Collection!), and recognize that they don't actually fit you, and by a different pair. This is easier if, like me, you only buy $40 shoes.

Or, for a more radical solution, try never wearing shoes at all. Scientists studied the feet of people from South India who "walk barefoot throughout life, mostly for spiritual or financial reasons." Their feet were a different shape than those of shoe-wearers, and pressure was more evenly distributed over the soles. This means shoes probably change the way our feet work, and not in a good way. However, they do protect us from hot asphalt and broken glass, which would probably necessitate more Nexcare Tape.

How To Wear High Heels Even When You Have Blisters [The Frisky]
Footwear Alters Normal Form And Function Of The Foot [ScienceDaily]