Last week, caught up in April Fools' Day revelry, we failed to mention the South Park episode "Eat, Pray, Queef," about the double standard women face when it comes to queefing versus farting.

In a reference to South Park's infamous April Fools' Day episode, when creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone ran a Terrance and Philip special rather than revealing the identity of Cartman's father, in the new episode the boys find that instead of part two of a Terrance and Philip episode, the network is airing an episode of The Queef Sisters. Their schtick is exactly the same as Terrance and Philip's, but while the men fart on each other, the ladies blow air out of their vaginas.

Soon queefing has swept the nation and, as seen in the clip above, the Queef Sisters share their talent on Regis and Kelly and Martha Stewart shows how to make queefs more festive. The men of South Park are repulsed by the new fad, but the women argue that it's no different than farting. The men finally realize the error of their ways when Stan's mom delivers a feminist speech on the real meaning of the right to queef, saying, "This has been about women having a little bit of fun for once at your expense. For once we could be the immature ones to make you feel uncomfortable."

It seems some men missed the point of the episode, as IGN reviewer Travis Fickett called the episode, "a textbook example of a disappointing South Park," adding:

Maybe there's new ground to break with fart jokes. It's doubtful, but possible - but this episode doesn't come anywhere close. It actually just becomes boring. What is it even trying to say? Is the big idea that there's some kind of double standard because men find farts funny but queefs disgusting? Are queefs anything that anyone anywhere has to deal with on an even semi-regular basis?

In The A.V. Club review, Josh Modell was less harsh but said:

Mrs. Marsh's big speech about women being second-class citizens was a little tired-don't try and feed some real-world consequence into an episode whose message of social consciousness is predicated on something nobody actually believes. (Women, I think I speak for all men when I say: Queef and fart when you feel the need, and when it's appropriate.)

Though it was entertaining to see an episode of South Park focused on the ladies, we agree that the tone of Sharon Marsh's speech was weirdly didactic. We were left wondering if Trey and Matt actually had a point about how men think women's natural bodily functions are gross but delight in their own, or if it was just an excuse to do some queefing jokes. Then there's the possibility that running an episode with a "feminist" message, however absurd, was just another April Fools' joke on the fans.

Eat, Pray, Queef Review [IGN]
Eat, Pray, Queef [The A.V. Club]

Earlier: Queefs: What's The Etiquette For Dealing With Air Up There?
"How Can I Prevent Queefing During Sex?"
Instructional Video: Queefing
The Gong Show: Queefing Is A Talent