Say It Ain't So, Fiddy: Celebs Let Non-Celebs Ghost-Write Their Twitters

On the heels of news that Christopher Walken isn't the real author of the surreal Twitter feed that bears his name, the Times tells us lots of celebs are hiring people to tweet for them.

50 Cent is one of the many stars to use a ghost-twitterer: his associate Chris Romero, who says Fiddy "doesn't actually use Twitter, but the energy of it is all him." Other people too famous to Twitter for themselves include Britney Spears, Barack Obama, and Ron Paul.

It's not really a surprise that politicians have their staffs Twittering for them. After all, Obama has a lot to do these days, what with saving the world and also showing up at Bulls games. But isn't part of the fun of following a star's Twitter the idea that you are getting unfettered, unfiltered access to their periodic 140-character musings? Isn't it more fun to look at a pic of Demi Moore's ass knowing that Ashton Kutcher really posted it, and is really gross enough to call Moore "wifey"? Don't you care about authenticity???

If the comments are any indication, no. When we sadly reported that Christopher Walken's horse-fearing, pimp-scarecrow-making Twitter feed was actually an experiment by decidedly non-Christopher-Walken provocateurs, you said: "I knew it was fake. I still find it hilarious...It's ok!" And: "i love reading them in my head with his voice. so great. i don't care if it's fake, still makes me giggle."

Though some were disappointed by the lack of Walken-ticity, it's clear that many of you viewed his feed as entertainment, and not a window into Walken's soul. Which is probably appropriate. But we can't say we're totally satisfied to touch the hem of Britney's spangly garment, or to absorb Fiddy's "energy." Luckily, there's always Shaq, who assures the Times that his Twitter feed is all him. "It's 140 characters," he says, "If you need a ghostwriter for that, I feel sorry for you." Thus he bears out the all-caps claim that forms his Twitter bio: "VERY QUOTATIOUS, I PERFORM RANDOM ACTS OF SHAQNESS." Shaq, you give us hope.

When Stars Twitter, a Ghost May Be Lurking [New York Times]