The Future Of Female Comedies May Sit Squarely On Tina Fey's Shoulders

Despite the "Tina Feytigue" experienced by some media mavens sick of the writer/actress/producer's PhotoShopped face coming at them from the cover of every magazine, I am still deeply psyched for Baby Mama, the Fey/Amy Poehler vehicle coming out on Friday. The Los Angeles Times points out that Universal, the studio that produced Forgetting Sarah Marshall as well as Baby Mama, was much more aggressive in marketing the former because it was a more typical romantic comedy. Lorne Michaels, SNL and BM producer, tells the paper, "Normally [comedies are] about a guy who gets dumped by a pretty girl and ends up with a prettier girl. This is not that."

Because the film is not typical boy-meets-girl fare, the Times is wondering if two women in their late 30s can carry a comedy in a world where 14-year-old boys (and men with 14-year-old mentalities) are the comedy film "sweet spot" of ticket purchasers. Baby Mama has neither big boobs, nor big bombs. Here's what Poehler has to say on the matter: "Everything is a harder sell until it's a success and then it's not." She continues:

What I'm proud of about this film is that there was an actual beginning and middle and end, and characters change and all that kind of stuff. Which is kind of like an actual movie? It's nice to be a part of that. Especially coming from the world with a lot of sketch, where everything is transient and temporary. It's nice to explore an actual arc in an actual film. I like movies that 14-year-old boys like, I like a lot of those. I would hope that they would like the same things I like too.
We all hope, considering that Baby Mama may break or make a new generation of female-centric comedies getting the greenlight.

Fey and Poehler Gamble With 'Baby Mama' [Los Angeles Times]
Tina Feytigue [Videogum]

Earlier: Tina Fey To Amy Poehler: I Wanna Put My Baby Inside You
Tina Fey: Comedienne, Cover Girl And "Great Role Model" For Women