Meet Satoshi Fujita: The Japanese "Mystery" With A Wig And A Prayer

"I always teach my students that sex comes first. Then you figure out whether the woman is worth marrying later." So says Satoshi Fujita (left), head of Tokyo's Pickup School For Men Who Can't Get Any. Fujita is like the Mystery of Japan: He helps insecure geeks get laid! And, like Mystery, Fujita has all kinds of tricks up his sleeve: For starters, he wears a wig. "It was so shocking when my hair started to fall out," he says. "I was scared to look in the mirror and completely froze up when I talked to women." His wig gave him confidence; he soon developed a "science" of chatting up chicks, using humor, compliments and, uh, magic tricks. Now he teaches other lame dudes nanpa, the art of picking up women. According to Wired, there are half a dozen nanpa schools in the Tokyo area, and Fujita's is the most popular. Classes are held on street corners: "Picking up women on the streets is the best method for people who need miracles," Fujita claims.

Fujita has written three self-help books for unpopular guys, and though he declines to reveal details of his technique, it does include flaming wallets, talking ferrets and animated algae balls. Unlike Mystery, Fujita doesn't seem to employ "negging" or insults, but he does use pop psychology: a deck of "psychoanalytic" cards help him determine what kind of girl he has picked up.

On one hand, Fujita seems to be making an impact on otherwise hopeless men; Hachioji Robocop (?!), 27, says, "Since joining Mr. Fujita's school, I have had five successful relationships. I lost my virginity six months into the course, and now I can now communicate with women. I'm very grateful." On the other hand, is it okay to teach guys to be deceitful and shystery with ladies? Even if, without said shady skills, they may never get laid? And looking at these bewigged and bespectacled dudes, don't they just reek of desperation?

Inside the Bizarre World of Japanese Pickup Schools, Students of the Pickup School for Geeks Gallery [Wired]

Earlier: My Mid-Morning Conversation With VH1's "Mystery"
Why Insulting Women Works. Wait, You Mean It Works?
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