How Come Women Don't Read Magazines On The Internet?

You may be aware that Conde Nast is the big publishing company responsible for most of our very most treasured women's magazines - - Vogue, Teen Vogue, Glamour, Allure, Self, W, etc. etc. — and that those very women's magazines, thanks to their huge circulations and all the companies with revolutionary new anti-aging serums and logo-purses they want to tell women about, are the proverbial "cash cows" of the magazine business. But a story in the Wall Street Journal reveals those same magazines are not the cash cows of Conde Nast's internet business — farrr from it! The company's top two magazine websites are Wired and Portfolio — and Portfolio just launched! — with Brides, Self and Vogue "online home" Style.com trailing in the distance with well under a million monthly unique visitors apiece. So what's the problem? Why can't they get a small fraction of their alleged readers to visit their websites once a month? Don't women read the internet? And even if they don't, isn't the internet the future? By which I mean, isn't the internet the present? Actually not! Says CondeNet CEO Sarah Chubb to the Wall Street Journal of all those magazine websites:

Their main purpose is a consumer-marketing purpose, a connection for the consumer to the brand. The reason for those sites first and foremost is renewing and selling subscriptions.
Ohhhhh, so they're not trying to make money by themselves, they're just there to remind you to kill more trees, then. See, they have this new strategy where they're starting blogs aimed directly at women , and the blogs are branded separately from the magazines, like this new website they're running focused on weight loss called ElasticWaist . ElasticWaist started in May, and already they've received some attention for using the F-word a lot, and since I didn't even have to venture out to the newsstands to buy it I checked it out on my own just now and...

Um.

Hey guys? Thank you. For reading, for commenting, for paying my rent, for tolerating my F-words. That's all.

Is CondeNet's Approach Paying Off? [WSJ]