The way a five-year-old acts, at five, does not turn out to dictate the way he acts in adulthood! That's according to the latest shocking new study, the results of which are actually so intuitive and "duh"-inspiring that everyone is feeling compelled to frantically email it to their friends and neighbors. The study mostly covers kindergarteners diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, I think, though I was too distracted to read it all the way through, and the upshot is that they are apparently no more likely to perform poorly in reading comprehension tests than normal, balanced kids later on in school. As someone who pretty much got lost every single time I went to the bathroom in kindergarten on account of (undiagnosed, but very very real) ADHD, the world gets a lot less aaah-overwhelming when you can sit in a corner and devote your full attention to r-e-a-d-i-n-g the text on a six-by-eight inch page. So yes, that part makes sense. But here's the scary part: Of the kids with ADHD they study, 80% of them are on stimulant drugs. Guys, really, save the amphetamines for later on in life, when your livelihood is at stake, maybe? [NY Times]