Do your attempts at fitness always end in failure? Perhaps the problem is in your head. "Exercise itself isn't rocket science," Pete Cohen, a health and wellbeing coach trained in psychology tells the Guardian. "It's getting people to enjoy it and stick with it in the long term that's the real challenge." Yeah, how does that happen? What if you work out and you're like, "Well, that was interesting, but I don't feel the need to do that again?" Keep talking to yourself, say experts. Behavior modification techniques like "self-talk," explains well-being consultant Jeff Archer, encourage "the belief that you're already living a healthy life rather than being on the way to one." As of way of driving that point home, the Guardian article includes some self-talk tips in the form of seven "steps to mental fitness", seven steps we couldn't help but annotate with some exercise-hating answers...



First: What are your reasons for exercise? Uh, weight loss, health, skinny jeans? Second: Set challenging but achievable goals. Like, one day, someday, you'll turn into one of those people who works out. Third: Learn to self-talk with positive, persuasive arguments. Um, tomorrow you'll totally jog, totally, for like, an hour. Just not today. Fourth: Stay "in the moment" during a work out — feel the breeze on your face while running. Yeah, the breeze feels great! So great that it might be nice to stop running and just stroll. Or stop in a shoe store. Fifth: Don't get stuck in a rut. Uh, too late. Sixth: Use visualization. Yeah, because after you're done picturing yourself in a kickboxing class, you won't really need to take one! Lastly: Congratulate yourself post-workout. Great job! Let's go get ice cream!

Think Yourself Fit [Guardian]