Trashing On 'Trash The Dress'

After spending months and months searching for the perfect wedding dress, a woman obviously wants to document its beauty for all posterity to see, relish, and honor. Or does she? Yesterday, the New York Times ran a curious piece in its "Weddings and Celebrations" section — because, you see, while the straights just get married, the gays also celebrate! — on the "Trash the Dress" phenomenon. "TTD," as it is annoyingly abbreviated, is a "trend" among also-annoying alterna-marrieds who think that nothing says "Fuck you, Martha Stewart!" quite like a bride submerging herself in water or setting herself on fire with her wedding dress still firmly pinned to her body.

The thing is, the one website referenced by the Times article, TrashTheDress.com, seems to have a different take on the TTD trend. In fact, the website's manifesto implies that TTD is less about iconoclasm and more about brides stroking the egos of their brand-new husbands!

You've made a commitment to your husband. He's your one and only true love, right? Then you'll never need the dress again. And no, your daughter won't wear it in 20-30 years. So you have two choices: 1) Suffocate it in plastic and throw it in a closet, 2) Show your husband how committed you are by trashing the dress, and get some great fun pictures while you do it!
"Great fun pictures"? Sounds, well... fun! But we have a couple of other suggestions for the TTD-inclined! How about, 1) Realize that your commitment to your husband has already been adequately expressed through the very act of saying "I Do" and 2) save yourself money by getting a dress made of toilet paper ! Seriously! You'll have a few more grand to spend on booze during the honeymoon, plus, you'll keep your hipster street-cred intact and have an easy way to clean up after your new brother-in-law drinks too much and gets sick on the dance floor!
Is This Any Way To Treat A Vera Wang? [NYT]
TrashThisDress.com
Earlier: Wear A Dress Made Of Toilet Paper, Help The World (Or At Least Your Wallet)
Related: A Defense of Traditional Wedding Photography [Slate]